Moving to Higher Ground - How Jazz can Change your Life を読む

Random House Trade Paperback "Moving to Higher Ground" を読んでゆきます(語句・文法解説付き)

<後半>ランラン「クラシック音楽を、世界市民として」(interview script)

インタビューの後半です。「音楽は耳から聴くだけじゃない」多角的な捉え方で、クラシックを子供達に広める活動をしているランラン。中国人として、世界市民として「僕らの世代はオープンでなければならない」と主張します。

 

*****************************************************************

 

T: Do you find, as you age, that certain piece of music, when you were younger, affected you this way ― now they affect that way? 

司会年齢が上がって同じ曲でも小さい頃に取り組んだときと今とではご自分に与える影響が違ってきていたりするんですか? 

 

L: Yeah, for example, you know, the piece I played ten years ago, even the piece I play tomorrow, it's slightly different because after ten years you learn a lot of new things. 

ランそうですね例えば同じ曲でも10年前に演奏したときと明日演奏するときではその10年間に沢山学んでますからちょっとは違いますよね 

And those new ideas give you another way, another alternative way to play this piece. So it's sometimes hard to know which one is better, but certainly it's a different input. 

そうやって学んだ新しいアイデアが、その曲の別の、今までの代わりになる演奏の仕方を教えてくれるんです。どちらが良いか、時々判断に苦しむことはありますけど、間違いなく、今までにない情報がインプットされることにはなりますね。 

 

T:  And you don't really care about which one is better per se? You just care about what you are feeling in the moment, correct? 

司会といってもあなたはどちらが良いかということにつては、あまり気にしないのではないですか?その場その場の感覚を大事にしていると思うのですが、違いますか? 

 

L: I mean, there are a certain, you know, a frame of the work you need to follow. You know, the instruction of the scores, obviously. 

ラン:ええとですね、楽曲には守らなければならない指示というのはあります。勿論それは、楽譜に書かれている指示ですね。 

But after that you need to free yourself, you know, and to put some, you know, personal ideas on top of the original scores. And the interesting (thing) is that when you hear the composers playing their piece, you see a very, kind of, an interesting input on top of the scores. So you know, that they gave you the room to do it. 

でもその後で元の楽譜を見て今度は自分の考えを自由に自分自身の考えを反映させなければなりません。面白いのはですね、作曲家自身の演奏を聞くと、楽譜に書かれていない解釈が聞けるんですよ。それを知ってからは、演奏家の自由裁量を更に確信しましたね。 

 

T. Interesting! Hey, you, you obviously as you started as a kid. I know that getting other young people involved in classical music is very important to you. Talk us about that. 

司会:それは面白いですね。さて、何度も触れますが、あなたは小さい頃にピアノを始めました。あなたにとって若い人にクラシック音楽に触れてもらうことはとても重要なことのようですね。その話を伺いましょうか。 

 

L: Yeah, so in 2008 I started a foundation based in New York called the Lang International Music Foundation. So now we have 15 very talented next generation artists, which we are mentoring them in our program. So some of them already played with me three times at Carnegie Hall. 

ランええ2008年ニューヨークにラン国際音楽財団立ち上げましてね。今15人の逸材がいまして、私達の教育プログラムで鍛えているところです。そのうちの何人かは、すでに僕と一緒に3回カーネギーホールに出演を果たしていますよ。 

 

T: Oh, my goodness! 

司会それはすごい 

 

L: Hopefully, you know, I'll bring some of them to Phoenix area next time. 

ランできれば次回は、何人かここフェニックスに連れてきたいですね。 

And we also started a public school support, what we call “Lang Land Aspires Program.” Now we gave about six hundred thousand dollars for three years in a school in Boston, and we gave them new instruments, and also we hired some teachers to train them in music. 

それから、公立学校に対する援助もはじめました。「ランラン熱血計画」といいます。ボストンの学校に3年間で60万ドル、更に新しい楽器とを寄付して、その学校の音楽指導に当たる教員を何人か雇用もしました。 

 

T: As far as getting young people involved in this type of music, how do you keep their attention? How do you get that spark? Because there's  ― between computers and the TV and the smart phones, and the this and the that, there's so much going on. 

司会:こういったタイプの音楽に若い人たちを巻き込むには、どうなさっているのですか?動機づけはどうしているんですか?というのはですね、その、コンピュータやテレビ、スマートフォン、などなど、様々なもの(メディア)がありますよね。 

So much of it is pop, quick, fast. How do you get them to figure out that that adagio  

really is something special? 

そういったものが次々と出ては、何でも素早く、そしてスピード感が溢れています。そういう中で若い人たちに、あなたが得意とするアダージョの曲が特別良いんだと、どうやってわかってもらうんですか? 

 

L: Obviously you don't start with adagio! 

ラン:そりゃ、最初からアダージョを聞かせようなんて思いませんよ。 

That's a great, I mean, a great suggestion because today our world becomes so fast and so, kind of, remotable, what you call, but actually in music, you know, when you think about it good performance, it's like a multi media platform, the only way, you know, to listen to music is the ear, right? 

今のはとても大事な話ですよね。なにせ今の時代何事も素早く、そしていわゆるリモート化していますからね。ですが音楽の場合、良い演奏とはどういうものか考えてみてください。演奏とは多方向から楽しむことが基盤となっています。演奏は耳からしか入ってきませんよね? 

But then you also, you know, when the music comes IN to your ears, comes IN to your brain, and they need to be vertical. They cannot be, you know, just a kind of flat. 

でも、耳から入れば、それが脳まで行って、となると、演奏とは耳から聞く以外の方向からも考えなければいけない。平面的な捉え方だけではいけない、ということになります。 

 

T: Yes. 

司会:そうですね。 

 

L: So you need to see the characters. You need to see the messages. You need to see the colors. You need to see the construction of the building. You need to see the dynamics. So I think everything needs to be multiple. 

ラン:ですから、演奏の持つ性格、伝えたいこと、色合い、演奏が作られていく様子、それから演奏を突き動かす原動力といったものも考えてゆかなければなりません。全てが多角的だと僕は思いますね。 

So in a way that, uh, this time of the year when I am talking about a music to kids, when we have, you know, we use smart phones, we use whatever pad. 

ですから今年僕は、子供達に音楽について話す時、手元にあれば、スマホでも何とかパッドでも何でも使いましたね。 

And we start also physically playing it together, not just talking, because talking is good, but it's more like a music class. What we want is to get people to play together. 

そして今回は実際に一緒に演奏することも始めました。話をするだけでなくね。というのも、勿論お話は大事ですが、それじゃ学校の音楽の授業と変わりませんからね。僕達は皆さんに一緒に演奏してもらうのが目的ですから。 

 

T: That's for kids. 

司会:それは子供達へのアプローチですね? 

 

L: Uh, huh. 

ラン:そうです。 

 

T: Let's talk about some older kids. Talk about adults here, who still find classical music intimidating, and they don't know what they're missing. 

司会:そしたら今度は大きな子供達、つまり大人ですね。彼らは依然としてクラシックは威圧的で、自分達に何が欠けているかが、わかっていないと思うんですよ。 

“Sounds, kind of, nice.” But there are people you are putting your heart and soul in to that, and that they are trying to figure out, “What am I mi ....” what are they missing? 

彼らは「まあ、良いんじゃないんですか」とは言いますよね。でもあなたが気持ちと魂を込めて演奏して聞かせた人達が、さあ、考えた挙げ句、「私は何がダメ・・・」彼らは何がダメなんですかね? 

What,....well, how do you tell someone this is what you need to do to appreciate classical music? 

あなたなら何と言ってあげますか?そういう人達に、クラシック音楽を聞いて有り難い気持ちになるにはどうしたら良い、と? 

 

L: I think they just need to go to, uh, more concerts. And, uh, maybe to see a good concert. 

ラン:そうですね、とにかく沢山演奏会に足を運んで、そう、できれば良い演奏会にね。 

 

T: Yeah, I... that's a good idea. Maybe not try so hard. 

司会:そうですね、いい考えだ。まだ努力が足りないってことですかね。 

 

L: Yeah, not try hard... not TRY hard, but to, you know, maybe you go to YouTube, you know, just to find some videos of, uh, you know, great musicians perform. People like Yo-Yo Ma, people like Itzhak Perlman, people like Pavarotti, you, know, and like Leonard Bernstein, you know, get, uh, maybe shorter clip. 

ラン:そうですね、努力が、というか「努力」ではなくてですね、例えばユーチューブでもいいですよ。素晴らしい演奏家の動画を探すでも良いんですよ。ヨーヨー・マとか、イツァーク・パールマンとか、パバロッティとか、バーンスタインでも、短めの動画もあるじゃないですか。 

And then, you know, I think it's very automatically, you know, and, uh, they just feel it. And when you feel it, everything opens. 

そうすれば、自ずと、音楽を感じることができます。そして感じてみれば、色々なことが開けてきます。 

 

T: Yes. 

司会:そうですね。 

 

L: And sometimes through some kind of a, maybe, paper in front of you. But if you, kind of, pass, if you break through, then everything, uh, kind of, comes. 

ラン:そして時には、皆さんと演奏家との間に、紙が一枚立ちはだかっていることもあると思います。でもその紙を、すり抜けたり、あるいは破り捨ててみてください。そうすれば、何もかもが皆さんの中にスッと入り込んできますよ。 

 

T: And you buy Lang Lang CD ever made, and you can't stop playing them. 

司会:あとはランランのCDを全部買って、ずっと聞き続けることですね。 

Hey, you played for the opening ceremonies at the Olympics, the '08 Olympics there in China. What was that like? 

そうだ、あなたは2008年の中国でのオリンピックの開会セレモニーで演奏しましたよね。あの時のことを教えて下さい。 

 

L: There was a gigantic stage, and I was playing with the little girl who was five years old at that time. And I was like a baby sitter. 

ラン:あの時は、巨大なステージがあって、そこで僕は当時5歳の女の子と一緒に演奏しましたね。舞台裏では僕は彼女のベビーシッターみたいになっていましたよ。 

And then, “You know, please.... don't run.”  You know, there are lots of people watching you now, you know. “Let's play together, you know, having fun.” 

「いいかい、お願いだからね、じっとしていてね。」お客さん沢山いましたからね。「一緒に楽しく演奏しようね。」 

And then after five minutes I couldn't find her. I was so scared, you know. 

そして5分後、その子いなくなっちゃったんですよ。僕はもう顔真っ青ですよ。 

 

T: Where did she go?! 

司会:どこへ行っちゃったんですかね? 

 

L: She's run somewhere. 

ラン:結局わからずじまいでしたけどね。 

 

T: But was .... did you, again talk about pressure when you were younger on a situation like that. You're a kind of, you were representing China and in many ways you do representing China in terms of the arts, in terms of the growth of the country where the country's future is headed. Do you feel pressure there? 

司会:しかしですね、またさっきの、あなたがまだ小さかった頃ステージ上で緊張しなかったどうかの話しに戻りますけどね。オリンピックの時は、あなたは中国を代表して舞台をこなした。それから色々な意味で、あなたは芸術面や中国の未来に向けての発展という側面でも、中国を代表して色々なことをしているわけですよ。プレッシャーはないんですか? 

 

L: Not really. I just do my best, you know, to perform and to be as a good, a kind of a cultural ambassador. 

ラン:ないですね。ベストを尽くして演奏して、まあ、ある意味文化を広める役割をしっかりこなすだけですよ。  

 

T: So you don't feel like necessarily a symbol of China's growth and China's changing sta... image on the stage. 

司会ということは中国繁栄の象徴としてとか、中国イメチェンの象徴としてとかで、ステージに上がる気はない、ということですね? 

 

L: I'm happy there, you know, I become a kind of, uh, a global citizen. You know, uh, to share what our generation is thinking about toward the future. 

ラン:舞台に上がれるのは嬉しいですよ。ある意味僕は、グローバルな市民になったということですからね。未来に向けて僕達の世代の人間が何を思っているかを共有することになるんですから。 

And I think it's..... And this generation needs to be very open generation to the global, I say, one big village, and I think, you know, as a musician, there's probably one of the best thing is that we are communicators, and through a piece you don't need to know the culture but you're kind of understood what you are talking about. 

僕は思うんですけれど僕達の世代はグローバルにオープンでなければならないと思っています。地球全体が一つの村、みたいにね。そして音楽家としての最高の役割の一つは、僕達は互いに意思疎通をしようとする者同士であるということ。作品を通して、文化なんかわからなくても、伝えることは理解してもらえるのですから。 

 

T: You live in New York, correct? Why do you live in New York? 

司会:今はニューヨークにお住まいとのことですが、どうしてですか? 

 

L: I used to live in Philadelphia, and I moved after graduation. And, uh, so, that's a very big city and, uh, a lot of people, so... a lot of parties! (laugh) 

ラン:僕は昔はフィラデルフィアに住んでいましたが、学校を卒業してニューヨークへ移ったんです。理由ですか・・・大きな都市ですし、人も沢山いますし、それに・・・パーティーも沢山あるからですかね(笑) 

 

T: Oh, OK, we could talk about that later. But you have places in China, as your hometowns in China, as well? 

司会:おっと、まあそのことは後でゆっくりと。でも中国にも拠点はあるんでしょう? 

 

L: Yes. 

ラン:ええ。 

 

T: OK. But most of the time in New York? 

司会:なるほど。でも大概はニューヨークにいらっしゃると? 

 

L: Most of the times I am actually in airplane. 

ラン:大概は、飛行機の中ですね、実際は。 

 

T: Before we go, I got to ask you, what is your, I mean, not necessarily to play, but when you just want to listen to the epidemy of a classical music, what do you listen to? 

司会:さて最後にうかがっておきたいのですが、あなたのですね、必ずしもご自身で演奏するものでなくても良いのですが、今日はクラシックを聴きたいな、と思ったときに聴くのは何ですか? 

 

L: I actually love to listen to Mahler symphonies. And I love to learn, you know, actually I love jazz. I ..... 

ラン:僕は実はマーラー交響曲を聴くのが大好きなんですよ。あと、やってみたいことなんですが、実は僕はジャズが大好きなんです。それで・・・ 

 

T: Do you? 

司会:そうなんですか? 

 

L: Yeah, my favorite artist is Herbie Hancock. 

ラン:ええ、僕のイチオシはハービー・ハンコックですね。 

 

T: Oh, you PLAYED with Herbie Hancock, didn't you? 

司会:そういえば、あなたはハービー・ハンコックと共演してましたね。 

 

L: One of my best friends. And he taught me a lot of, uh, great tricks.... 

ラン:僕の大の仲良しの一人ですし、沢山教わりましたよ、極意を・・・ 

 

T: Isn't that something! 

司会:そりゃすごい! 

 

L: .... for playing jazz. 

ラン:ジャズを演奏する上でのね。 

 

T: Isn't that something! 

司会:素晴らしいですね。 

(後略) 

ランラン「『聞いてくれ!』と思ったらダメ」(interview script)

中国のピアニストランランの、2013年のテレビインタビューから私が聴き取ったものです。Arizona Horizon で検索してみてください 

 

NHK大河ドラマおんな城主直虎メインテーマピアノソロハービー・ハンコックとの共演古くは北京オリンピック開会式でメディアに登場、今や世界中の人気者です。 

 

情熱的な弾き方は賛否が別れています。今回インタビューの前半では、そのことについて語られています。 

 

文中のkind of は、日本語では「っていうか/みたいなぁ」、you knowは「えっと/ね?」に相当する間投詞です。 

 

*************************************** 

 

Ted Simons: Good to see you here, thanks for joining us. 

司会ようこそいらっしゃいました 

 

Lang Lang: Thank you, Ted. 

ランランありがとうございますテッドさん 

 

T: I mean, you are, you are a big deal on a classical music. Before we get to all that business, though, (have) you been to Arizona before? 

司会今やクラシック音楽を代表する超有名人です。さて本題に入る前にですが、アリゾナ州へはおいでになったことはありますか? 

 

L: Yes, it's actually my sixth time in a... 

ランええ実は今回6回目の・・・ 

 

T: Sixth time! What do you think? 

司会6回目ですかアリゾナ州いかがですか 

 

L: It's very nice and hot! (laughing) 

ラン:とてもいいところですし暑いですね(笑) 

 

 T: (laughing) OK. Have you had a chance to kind of see the scenery much? And I wonder about concert artists and such. Do you just kind of go to a town and stay in the hotel, and perform and go back to the hotel? How much do you get around? 

司会:(笑)なるほど。 ところで観光する機会はありましたか?演奏家の皆さんってどうなんでしょう?現地に入ってホテルに詰めて、本番やってまたホテル、なんて感じなんでしょうか?街に出れたりしてますか? 

 

L: I remember my first time being here was 2001, and, uh... I still remember I came with my father. And it was .... We were prepared a Chinese box before the concert and we take out from the freeze, so it's a bit cold. So we put it on the street. So five minutes later we had a very nice dinner. 

ラン:最初にここへ来たのは、2001年、その時は父が一緒でした。本番前に中華弁当を用意していただいてましたね。冷蔵ボックスから出したのでちょっと冷たかったのですが、道端に置いておいたら、5分でとっても美味しく温まっていましたね。 

 

T: There you go! It's boiling the egg on the... frying the egg on the side walk here. 

司会:そうなんですよ!ここアリゾナ州では、暑くて、歩道でゆで卵…じゃなかった目玉焼きが作れるくらいですからね。 

 

T: I got to ask you before I get you what you're doing now. I want to know about... because you were a prodigy. You started very young but you started.... you were inspired by a cartoon, a “Tom and Jerry” cartoon? Talk to us about that. 

さて現在のご活躍の様子をうかがう前に、まずはですね、とにかく天才ピアニストさんですのでね。ピアノを始められたのは随分小さい頃だったそうですね。ただ始めたときは…なにかアニメでしたっけ、「トムとジェリー」ですか?まずそのことからうかがいましょう。 

 

L: So I was two years and a half. And my parents bought me the piano, but that's already when I was one year old. 

ラン2歳半のときですね両親がピアノを僕に買ってくれて… あ、それは1歳の時のことです。 

 

T: Wow! 

司会1歳で 

 

L: So I was watching one of my favorite cartoons, uh,... “Tom and Jerry,” and, as you know, there's an episode called “The Cat Concerto.” So Tom, you know, with tuxedo, nice tie, and start playing the piano. And that was my first inspiration. 

ラン:僕が好きだったアニメの一つにトムとジェリー」がありまして御存知の通りその中に「キャット・コンサート」っていう話があるんです。トムがですね、タキシードを着て、カッコいい蝶ネクタイをして、ピアノを演奏し始めるわけですよ。それが取っ掛かりです。 

 

I had a look at the big concert grand piano, and I looked at my little upright piano. And (thought) “Oh, that's the father and that's the son.” So I start(ed) playing. Those (were) my try-out. 

テレビには大きな演奏会用のグランドピアノが映っていて、そしてふと、部屋にあった小さなアップライトのピアノを見たんです。そして「ああ、こっちがお父さんピアノで、あっちが赤ちゃんピアノか」って思ったんです。それでピアノをやってみようと思ったんです。 

 

T: Was it something that... How old were you when you felt the .... I mean, because the kids are kids, and adults kind of feel the music differently. But when did you feel that music as part of you? 

司会ということはお幾つだったんですかそのつまりですね子供時代と大人になってからでは音楽に対する感じ方も変わってくるでしょうからね、その、自分は音楽でやっていこうと思ったのはお幾つのときですか? 

 

L: I would say when I performed frist time. I was five years old. 

ラン:初めて舞台で弾いたときですね。5歳でした。 

 

T: Five years old? 

司会:5歳ですか? 

 

L: Yeah. And I played Chopin's “Minute Waltz.” And I thought that was such a beautiful music, and also, you know, the stage light, like now, it's warm, and, uh .... also after playing, I got a flower from a little girl. I thought that was cool. 

ラン:ええ、その時はショパンの「子犬のワルツ」を弾きました。その時思ったのは、この曲きれいだな、とか、ステージの照明が温かいな、とか、あとは… そう、演奏が終わったときに女の子から花をもらって、こりゃいいやって思いましたね。 

 

T: Five years already! When you start(ed) so young, and you're good so young, and people are watching you. Didn't you feel pressure at all? 

司会:5歳でね!そんなに小さい頃からピアノをはじめて、皆が見ている中で、プレッシャーとか感じませんでした? 

 

L: Well, I mean, I must say it was not always, you know, very lucky. When I was seven I joined a competition, in which I actually got lost. So I was right, num, num, num, even number seven. So I got a consolation prize, a little toy. But I think that was actually what encouraged me the most for so many years. So I think sometimes when you are NOT so good, it actually makes you try to work harder. 

ラン:そうですね、何ていうか、僕はこれまで決して運に恵まれていたわけではないです。7歳のときにコンクールに出て、そこではダメだったんですよ。えーっと、結局7番目だったですね。残念賞に小さなおもちゃをもらいましよ。ただお陰でその後長い間それはかなり気持ちのバネになりましたね。だから思うんですけど、時には良くない時ってありますけれど、それは実際は自分の心を駆り立てて、もっと頑張ろう!という気にさせてくれますよね。 

 

T: Interesting! And you did work harder, and you did obviously move up in terms. Again, it seems though you connect with the audience in ways that might be a little different than other artists. Talk to... Do you feel it.... Do you feel it when you are connecting with the audience? 

司会:興味深いお話ですね。実際あなたはその後頑張って、実際一流になったわけですからね。さて、あなたが聴衆に音楽を訴えかけるやり方というのが、他の演奏家とはちょっと違うように感じるんですけれど、どうなんでしょう、あなたはそれを演奏中感じておられますか? 

 

L: I would say no matter whether you are a pop star, whether you are a jazz musician, or you are a classical musician, in the end we need to get moved by the music. and we need to be totally connected with our heart and our soul to the composition that we are playing. 

ラン:そうですね、アイドル歌手でも、ジャズミュージシャンでも、それからクラシックの演奏家もそうですが、結局は自分が音楽に感動できないと、じゃないでしょうかね。それだからこそ、自分が演奏している作品に心も魂も繋がっていくと思うんですよね。 

And sometimes I felt that you're going to a concert, everything was very perfect, but somehow the soul, the heart, is not there. And I think it's very important when audience or musicians listen to another performance, what they like to hear is your sincere, your sincerity. And that, you know, the totally concentrated bridge between your heart and the keyboard. 

それから、時々演奏会に行って思うんですけれど、何もかもが完璧なのに、何だか魂や心がそこにない、って感じることがあります。あと、聴衆の方も、あるいは演奏家が他の演奏家の演奏を聴く時も、音楽を聞く時は、演奏家の心からの真心を聞きたいんだと思うんですよ。それがわかってはじめて、自分の心と楽器との間に、完全に橋がかかるんです。 

 

T: When you have your heart and your keyboard bridged like that, how do you know there's another bridge going out to the audience? How do you know they are with you? 

司会:自分の心と楽器との間に橋がかかったとしてですよ、もう一つ、自分と聴衆との間に橋がかかったかどうかは、どうやったら分かるものなんですか?聴衆が自分についてきているって、どうやったら分かるものなんですか? 

 

L: I actually, you know, the thing is when you start thinking about that, then it becomes artificial. If you like. “Hey! Look at me! Look at me!”... you know, that is not good. You need to be totally sincere. So the thing is when you are moved by the music yourself, then you have a chance to move to other people. 

ラン:実際にですね、それを意識してしまったら、あざとくなるものです。「さあ、僕を見てくれ!僕を見てくれ!」っていうのは、あまり良くないですね。完全に邪念を捨てないといけません。自分が音楽に感動して、はじめて他の人に感動してもらえるんです。 

 

T: It's interesting you mention that, because some critics of your style say you're too flamboyant, you're too showy. Is .... first of all, respond to that, what is the difference between having a flair and having that connection, and being too showy? 

司会:あなたの口からそれが聞けて嬉しいですね。というのも、評論家の中には、あなたがケバケバしいとか、わざとらしいとかいう人もいるんですよ。その…まずお聞きしたいのはですね、才能があって、そして先程から話されている「橋がかかる」、ということと、わざとらしさ、この二つの違いは何だと思いますか? 

 

L: I mean there are a lot of different kind of repertoire. I mean, tomorrow we will play a very virtuosic piece, Prokofiev's third piano concerto. And that is absolutely, you know, you need to be, you know, not to show off but to give all your abilities, you know, to take it out. 

ラン:楽曲には様々な種類があるということです。そうですね、明日演奏するのはかなり技術的にすごい曲で、プロコフィエフのピアノ協奏曲第3番ですが、これなんかは完全に、その、やるべきことっていうのはですね、自分の技術をひけらかすのではなくて、自分の技術をすべて出し切ること。そうでないとこの曲は弾ききれません。 

But sometimes when you play really incredible music by Beethoven, like, slow movement, adagio, you know, or by Brahms, and that time everything becomes to heart, the intellectual power rather than, you know, the technique part. It depends on the pieces. Almost like a great actor. You need to be capable in ... uh... playing different roles. 

でも時には、ベートーヴェンのゆっくりな楽曲、アダージョだの、ブラームスの作品だの、本当にすごい作品を弾く時は、全て心の問題、つまり、小手先の技術というよりは知性感性が物を言います。だから楽曲によるっていうわけですよ。優秀な俳優さんのように、ですね、色んな役を演じられなければならないわけです。 

 

T: Do you find yourself as you age, handling that differently? Are you different now than you're ten years ago in terms of that persona on stage? 

司会:いまおっしゃったことは、あなたが歳を重ねるにつれて取り組み方が変わってきていると思いますか?舞台上でのあなたの「顔」は、10年前と今とでは変わったと思いますか? 

 

L: It's a little bit easier to calm down a bit when you're getting a certain level of playing, a certain maturity. But I mean the freshness of what you call the instincts shouldn't change because, if your instinct changes, then it's not good. 

ラン:一定の演奏レベル、一定の成熟度になってからは、心を冷静に保つことは、少しは楽にできるようになりましたかね。でも、いわゆる燃えるような思いというものは、常に新鮮でなければなりません。それが変わってしまうのは良いことだとは思いません。 

 

 

次回はインタビューの後半、北京オリンピックの思い出や、中国人として自分はどうあるべきかについて語ります。 

 

R. ムーティ「アンサンブルは人の世の在り方」(script of speech)

愉快な名指揮者、リッカルド・ムーティ(Riccardo Muti)が、2011年のビルギット・ニルソン賞(The Birgit Nilsson Prize)受賞記念スピーチからの抜粋です。拙作ながら、聴き取って訳してみました。

 

どうしたら人々は仲良く共存できる?オーケストラや合唱は世の中の縮図答えはそこにあるだから音楽教育は絶対必要なんだ。 

 

ムーティはスピーチの際ユーモアを交えることが多く、このスクリプトでは省略しましたが、前半4分ほどはお笑いの連発でした。 

 

ジャンルを超えて、「ミュージシャン」の皆さんに共有していただきたい名スピーチですイタリア人の彼にとっては英語は母語ではありませんのでご了承のほど・・・ 

 

ネットで検索して映像と合わせて御覧くださいスクリプトはスピーチの後半のみ 

 

********************** 

 

Music is extremely important. Education in music is essential, fundamental. Why? 

音楽はとても大事です音楽教育は無くてはならないし、教育の基本です。なぜか? 

 

Not because we are to make miserable life of our children, with the small flute them out, and play every morning “TEE-TE-TEE-TE・・・” 

別に、子供達が惨めな生活を送っているからといって、何とかしてやろうと思い、小さな笛を持ち出して、毎朝「ピーヒャラピーヒャラ」吹こうってわけではありません。 

(make+O+C  OをCにしてしまう) 

 

Because we teach music: we teach poison in that way, and we alienate people from music. 

私達は音楽を教えるのです。これでは台無し、みんな音楽から遠ざかってしまいます。 

 

What is important is to teach the young boys and girls in the modern society that, in orchestra, a symphonic orchestra, or a chorus, is the symbol of a society; how a society should work and stay together. 

大事なのは、今時の男の子達や女の子達に、楽団、オーケストラや合唱団というのは、社会の縮図であり、社会がどうやって動いているか、どうやって人々が仲良くやってゆくのかを、象徴している、そんなことを教えてやることです。 

(what is important is:関係代名詞のwhat) 

Because we've seen that now, with the Royal Orchestra, the Royal Opera Orchestra. And I want to thank them and also the soprano and the chorus that we are seeing later, and Maestro (Gianandrea) Noseda, my colleague, for what they are doing tonight for this occasion. 

見たことありますでしょ今日はここに王立管弦楽団えっと王立歌劇場管弦楽団、彼らとソプラノ独唱の方、それから合唱団の皆さん、そして私の仲間でもあります指揮者のノセダさん、今夜この良き日に、これから聞かせていただきます皆さんに、お礼を申し上げたいと思います。 

(what we are seeing / what they are doing ごく近い未来を表す現在進行形) 

 

But as I was saying that in an orchestra you see the violin, viola, cello, contrabass, flute, oboe, clarinet, trombone, fagott, percussion... 

さて、先程も言いましたように、オーケストラには楽器が色々あります。バイオリン、ビオラ、チェロ、コントラバス、フルート、クラリネットトロンボーンファゴット、打楽器・・・ 

 

And in a score they are altogether written there in the page of the score. 

そしてスコアを見ますと、こういった楽器が、同じページに一緒に書かれているのです。 

 

Everyone has a different line, and all the lines should... SHOULD! ― because sometimes they don't ― go together and play together. 

各楽器はそれぞれに五線が与えられていて、いずれも必ず・・・「必ず」です!こう言っておかないと、時々そうならないことがありましてね。足並みをそろえて、演奏しなければなりません。 

 

And every player knows that his freedom must exist, but should not stop or damage the freedom of the other player. 

そして各奏者は、自分の自由について、確保はされるけれど、決して他の奏者の自由を遮ったり損ねたりしてはいけないことを、よく自覚しています。 

 

But all the players, together in their freedom and expressing their feelings, they all must work in one direction; that is, HARMONY. 

その中で奏者全員一つになって各自の自由が保証され思いの丈を表現し、そして全員が一つになって向かう先にあるもの、それが「ハーモニー」(調和/和音)です。 

(expressing their feelings:分詞構文) 

 

When children learn to stay together and to have this concept of the good and harmony that must be equal for everybody, then they learn how to stay together in a society. 

子供達が一緒に過ごすとか良い関係とか調和の取れた関係とかそれが皆に平等でなければならないとか、そういう物の考え方を身につければそうすれば彼らは社会でどう共存してゆくか、ということが分かってくるのです。 

(learn to stay : ~できるようになる 

 

I'm trying to say to insist on this subject since... forty years, and, uh... so, I'm sure that even if conductors are... they sometimes think that they are God, I know that I don't have another forty years in front of me. 

私はこれは大事なことなんだ、と、ずっと言おうとしてきているんです40年も当然のことながら仮に指揮者というものが・・・時々自分達のことを神様だと錯覚したりもしますが、まあ、私もまた更に40年も生きられるとは思ってませんけどね。 

 

Or maybe? I don't know. 

それとも生きられるかってそれはわかりません 

 

And if I have it, I will insist in this concept. 

もし生きられたらこれからもこの考え方を訴え続けますよ。 

 

And then music doesn't know barriers. 

そして音楽には人との間を隔てる壁などありません。 

 

When we go to different countries, we have our musicians play together with the musicians of the towns, of the cities that we visit. 

海外公演にゆけばオーケストラのメンバー達は、その国で訪れる街や都市の演奏家達と一緒に演奏します。 

訳注ゲスト出演のご当地プレーヤーや、現地で手配するエキストラ奏者達のこと) 

 

And they sit together. They don't know their names. They don't know (that) they have different culture, they speak different languages, they belong, sometimes or many times, to different religions, they have different colors in their skin. 

彼らは舞台で席を同じくします名前を知らない者同士です文化が違うことも知らない言葉が違うことも知らない時々もしかしたら多くの場合宗教が違うことも知らない肌の色が違うことも知らない 

 

But everything disappears because they have the same heart and the heart starts to beat in the same way, for everybody, in everybody, and they play and they sing together. 

でもそんなものは全部吹き飛んでしまいますなぜなら私達人間は同じ心臓を持っていて心臓は同じように脈打つものですから一人一人にそれはあり一人一人の中でそれは息づくのですそうやって集まったメンバー達が、一緒に楽器を演奏したり一緒に歌を歌ったりするのです 

訳注心臓を持つ脈打つ → heart→思いを持つ/高揚感を覚える) 

 

This is the reason why I am worried about the future because Europe is forgetting the importance of our culture, our tradition, our history. 

そう考えると私は未来が不安でならないなぜならヨーロッパは自分達の文化伝統歴史の大切さを忘れつつあるからです 

 

We are today what we have been. And we will be what we are today. 

私達の今は過去の積み重ねの結果であり私達の未来は今の在り方次第です 

 

So music and culture are parts extremely important of the history of Europe. 

ですから音楽と文化は、ヨーロッパの歴史にとって非常に重要なのです。 

 

So I take this opportunity from the stage of this prestigeous opera house in front of the Kings, in front of all the authorities to send a message that certainly was a message that Birgit Nilsson sent in all the years of her musical life. 

この機会をいただきこの最高の歌劇場の舞台の上から、スウェーデン王室の皆様と財団関係者の皆様の前で、ビルギット・ニルソンが、彼女の音楽人生を通して訴え続けたに違いないメッセージを捧げます。 

 

Let's help the new generations toward good future. And one of the weapons is music and culture. 

これからの新しい世代の人々を助けよう。そしてそのための武器の一つが、音楽であり、文化なのだ。 

 

This is what I want to say in this moment. And I will not say anything else because when I go to this subject I feel really sad because it seems that our Europe is losing little by little certain values. 

私が今申し上げたいことは以上です。これ以上は申しません。なぜなら、この話に入っていくと、本当に泣きたくなります。我々ヨーロッパ人は、ある種かけがえのないものを、今も少しずつ失っているからです。 

 

And music can help. GLACCHE! 

そこで役立つのが音楽というわけですグラッチェありがとうございました)!

<後半>エヴェリン・グレニー「聴く、とは、相手を見つめること」

「聴く、とは、相手を見つめること」 

Listening is about looking at a person. 

 

今回はその後半です。 

 

中学時代オーケストラ部を見学に行った時、打楽器のの先生に言われた、体で感じて聴くようにとの一言で、彼女の人生が大きく変わります。 

 

******************* 

 

Anchorperson:You mentioned that you lipread because that's actually what to do. Yeah, and it's hard to believe when talking to you because you do that very well. But the fact is that you started to lose your hearing when you were eight years old. And what happened? 

司会:今読唇って言ったけどたしかに今君がやっていることなんだけどねまああまりにもスゴイんで、君と話しているとホントに読唇しているのかと思ってしまうくらいなんだ。でも実際に、君は8歳の時に聴覚が落ち始めたんだよね。そこからどうなったの? 

 

Evelyn Glennie: Well, I had mumps and then the nerves of the ears deteriorated.  

エヴェリン:ええおたふく風邪にかかって耳の神経が壊れてしまったの 

So by the time I was twelve I was dependent on hearing aids. 

だから12歳で補聴器に頼るようになったの。 

And what I found was that the sound was boosted tremendously, but I didn't have control of the sound. 

でも今度は音が大きくなりすぎて丁度いいところで聴くことができなくなってしまったの 

And I didn't know where the sound was coming from. 

身の回りの音がどこから鳴ってくるのかが全然わからなくなって。 

So it wasn't so much that I couldn't HEAR sound. 

だから、聞こえなくても別に大したことないやって思っていた。 

I was almost hearing too much of that. 

だってどうせ聞こえてもウンザリするだけだからね。 

And I remember when I went to secondary school and I was already playing the piano, but I assumed that sound had to come from the ears. 

それで今でも忘れられない中学校に上がったときのことその頃はピアノが弾けていたんだけれど、まあ、当然、音っていうのは耳から入ってくるものだと思っていたわ。 

And when I was introduced to the school orchestra I saw the percussion section. 

ある日学校のオーケストラ部見学に行った時打楽器セクション目に入ったの 

I thought “Wow, that's sort of intriguing because some instruments are small, some are large, some people are standing up to play, som people are crouching down to play things” 

それを見て私思ったのああこれは面白い小さい楽器も大きい楽器もあるし立って演奏している人もいるしかがみ込んで演奏している人もいる。」 

And I thought I want to be part of that, I'm quite curious toward that. 

私もここに入りたい、これは本当に面白そうって思ったの。 

Now they could've said “I don't think so. You know, deaf, music? No, they don't marry at all.” 

当時、部の方から「いや、入れないでしょ、耳が聞こえなくて音楽?結びつかないでしょ」って言われてもおかしくなかったかもしれないわね。 

But they did, and curiousity, of my perscussion teacher where he believed, will, you know, sort of propel you in a direction. 

でも「結びついた」のよ。そして部の打楽器の先生のお考えで、人間好奇心さえあれば、行けるところはあるもんだって言うわけ。 

He said, “Evlyne, would you be able, EVLYNE (chuckle), would you be able to hear more if you took your hearing aids off?” 

先生が言ったのはね「エヴェリン、あのね、エヴェリン、補聴器外しても聞こえるかどうか、やってみてくれる?」 

Now, of course I thought he landed from Mars. 

勿論その瞬間、「何だこの人?わけわかんない人ね」って思ったの。 

Really, I mean, what a question to ask. 

ホントよね、何てこと訊くのって思うじゃない。 

Of course I am not to hear more. 

勿論、外したらもっと聞こえるようになる、そんなわけないじゃないって。 

He repeated the question, and I took my time, and I thought “give it a go.” 

先生が質問を繰り返してきたもんだから、私ちょっと考えて、「やりゃいいんでしょ」って思ったの。 

I took my hearing aids off. 

補聴器を外して 

He struck a drum and he said “Evlyne, where can you FEEL that sound?” 

先生は太鼓を一発叩くと、こう訊いたの「エヴェリン、この音、君の体のどこで感じる?」 

And I thought “Where can I feel that sound?” 

「どこで感じるですって?」って思うじゃない。 

Suddenly my whole body had to stop and really be patient to LISTEN to that sound, so that the sound, really sort of, seeped through the body, and not just be coming through the ears as I thought it would be so that stike, that initial impact came through the ears, but the resonance, then, was felt through the body. 

そしたらね、突然私の体がピタリと止まって、体全体どこでも音が通っていけるように、じっと「聴かなきゃ」ってなったの。今まで思っていたのと考え方を変えて、最初は耳に入ってきたとしても、そこから音の響きは体全体で感じるものだって。 

It was just a HUGE revelation for me, it completely changed my life. 

私には大きな大きな神様のお告げってやつでそこから人生大きく変わったわ 

 

A: Do you use hearing aids today? 

司会今日は補聴器は使っているの 

 

E: No, I don't. 

エヴェリンいいえ、今日は使ってないわ。 

 

A: Well, Evlyne, or Dame Evlyne, could you please give us a little demonstration? We have, we have your instrument, your , your little table. 

司会:さて、エヴェリン、あるいはエヴェリン卿(訳注:大英帝国勲章により「デイム」の叙勲を受けているので)というべきでしょうか、ここで少し演奏をお聞かせ願いたいのですが。こちらのテーブルに楽器をご用意しておりますので。 

 

E: Oh, woodblocks! 

エヴェリン:あら、ウッドブロックね? 

 

A: Yes, and we prepared that, and if you could just show how it work? 

司会:はい、ご用意しました。どんな風に演奏するのか見せていだければ、と思います。 

 

E: Oh, my heavens above, these are just two wood blocks 

エヴェリン:ええ、喜んで。これは何の変哲もないウッドブロックですわ。 

So if I say to you, have a look at these woodblocks, what do you think they FEEL like? 

そしたらね、このウッドブロックを見て、あなたはこれがどんな感じがすると思う? 

 

A: Uh, ... Hard? 

司会:どんなって・・・硬い? 

 

E: Hard? Do you think it's a fat sound, do you think it's a thin sound, a frightening sound? 

エヴェリン:硬い?厚みの音がするとか、薄っぺらい音がするとか、おっかない音がするとかなんだけど? 

 

A: I think it's a fat sound because of the space inside. 

司会:厚みのある音かな、この中に空間があるみたいだから。 

 

E: OK, so if you were suddenly sitting twenty rows back there, would you say the same thing? 

エヴェリン:そうね、じゃあ、もしあなたが今このスタジオの客席で20列後ろにいたら、同じように答えるかしら? 

 

A: Nope 

司会いや 

 

M: We are about to find about. 

男性まあやってみようじゃないか 

 

E: We all have different experiences. 

エヴェリン私達は皆境遇が違うものよ 

 

A: Yeah, yeah, yeah. 

司会ええええええ 

 

E: So we just assume eveyone is experiencing the same instrument, in the same way, and the same dynamics and so on, and that's not the case at all. 

エヴェリンだからねその場に居合わせている人がみんなその楽器を見て同じように、同じ音量で、とか何とか、いうように思っているというのは、全然違うのよ。 

So we all have our own PERSONAL situation or where we are; if we are sitting under a balcony, or up in a box, or back there, or right in front row, or whatever it may be. 

皆それぞれ自分が置かれている状況や環境が違うのよ。ここでも、バルコニー席の下とか、ボック席の中とか、後ろの方とか、最前列とか、色々ね。 

So if I strike one little block and really, really imagine what the total sound might be, even if we don't know where it goes, but .... (strike) 

それじゃ、一つ小さい方を叩いてみるわね。音全体としてどんな風に聞こえてくるか想像してみてね。どこにどう音が飛んでいくかわからないけれど・・・(叩く) 

 

Goldie Hawn: Ooophs! 

ゴールディ・ホーンビックリしたぁ。 

 

A: ........... Yeah, we can hear that. 

司会・・・えっと、はい、聞こえるよ。 

 

E: You can hear that, but where could you feel it? (strike again) 

エヴェリン:聞こえるわよね、でもどこで感じるかしら?(もう一回叩く) 

 

A: It's like..... my spine. 

司会:まあ・・・背骨、みたいな? 

 

E: Your spine! 

エヴェリン:背骨ね。 

 

A: Yeah, I'd say that. 

司会:うん、どこか?って言われればね。 

 

E: OK, so if I play a little piece of muisic, and you concentrate on listening to this with your spine, or through your spine, but just pay attention to your spine and see what happens. (start playing the music) 

エヴェリンいいわそしたらこれから一曲演奏します背骨であるいは背骨を通して聞いてでも背骨に集中して、そしてどうなるか注意していてくださいね。(演奏開始)

 

(大きな拍手)

エヴェリン・グレニー「聴く、とは、相手を見つめること」(interview script)

エヴェリン・グレニー(Evelyn Glennie)世界屈指の打楽器奏者がゲスト出演した、TVインタビューショーを、私が聴き取ったものです。ブルーノ・マーズビル・ゲイツ、コフィ・アナン前国連事務総長も出演したSVT / NRK/ Skavlan です。検索してチェックしてみてください。 

 

エヴェリンがゲスト出演した時のインタビューコーナーのタイトルは 

 

「聴く、とは、相手を見つめること」 

Listening is about looking at a person. 

 

今回はその前半です。 

 

エヴェリンの「聴いて」「聴く」を、「見つめる」に置き換えて、読んでみてください。 

 

******************* 

 

Anchorperson:Please welcome, Evelyn Glennie. 

司会者:それではお呼びしましょう、エヴェリン・グレニーさんです。 

 

Man: Hi, Evelyn, good to see you. 

男性:やぁ、エヴェリン、ようこそ。 

 

A:Hei, Evelyn, welcome to the show. 

司会:エヴェリン、ようこそ。 

 

Evelyn Glennie: Thank you. Actually, it's Evelyn, not “EEVLIN” 

エヴェリン・グレニー:どうも。あの、私の名前は「エヴェリン」、「イヴリン」じゃないわ 

 

Victoria Silvstedt: Oh, is it? 

ヴィクトリア・シルブヴステッド:あら、そうなの? 

 

E:Yean, it's Evelyn, yeah. 

エヴェリン:ええ、そうよ、エヴェリンなの。 

 

A: It's like, uh, Skandiavian pronunciation, sounds like. OK, I'm sorry. 

司会:なるほど、北欧語みたいな発音になってしまったね、すみません。 

 

E: No, not at all. 

エヴェリン:いえいえ、とんでもない。 

 

M: OK, Freddy. 

男性:大丈夫だ、フレディー。 

 

A: Tell me, you're gonna perform a little piece for us later. And I wonder, when I see this script, what's going on in your head? 

司会:さて、君には後ほど演奏を少し披露してもらうんだけれど、今日このスタジオを見て、今なにか思うことはある? 

 

E: Oh, my goodness me. That's impossible to say, because in every occasion it's so different. But ultimately it starts with listening.  

ええとそう言われてもちょっと難しいわ。だって状況によって違うから。でも、結局何にしても、まずは聴くことかしら。 

You know, this is kind of the machine, or the engine as it were. So you know, in every occasion it's different.  

まあ、要は機械やエンジンを扱うときと同じで、状況によって臨機応変にね。 

You're listening to the room you're in. You're listening to how you're feeling, you're listening to what you're wearing, the platform you're standing on, how the audience is configurated, you know, whether they're sitting on cushion seats, or carpets, or curtains, or whatever.  

自分がいる部屋の中をよく聴いて、自分の心の中をよく聴いて、自分の身につけているものとか、立っている場所とか、あとお客さんの座っている様子もね。クッションに座っているのかとか、床にはカーペットが敷いてあるのかとか、カーテンはどうか、とかだったりね。 

So you know, the instruments I play just happen to be the tools. It's almost like ingredients as you're cooking your meal. But ultimately, my job is to take those ingredients and to create a sound meal. But I have to start with listening, a pallette of listening.     

だからつまり楽器っていうのは道具で、要は食事を用意する時の食材みたいなものね。結局私のやっていることって、どの楽器を使うか選んで、出てくる音を材料に料理を作ってゆくようなものなの。でも最初にしなきゃいけないことは聴くことね。何を聴くべきかをパレットの上に載せてゆくの。 

 

A: But you need to have a sense of rhythm as well. 

司会リズム感も良くないといけないよね 

 

E: Everybody does, everybody.  

そんなのは一人一人それぞれ持っているものよ 

 

A: Do we? 

司会本当に 

 

E: You and your profession does. A politician does. A jockey does. 

エヴェリンあなたも持ってるしあなたの同業の方もみんな持ってるわ。政治家だって、競馬の騎手だってね。 

We all have rhythm. We all begin life with rhythm. And actually, we all begin life as percussion players in the womb. 

リズム感はみんなが持ってるの。生まれたときにはリズム感が備わっているの。人間てみんな、お母さんのお腹の中にいるときには、みんなバーカッション奏者なのよ。 

You know, we're fighting away there, beating away there.  

そうでしょ、ね、お腹の中でもがいたり、蹴ったり叩いたりするじゃない。 

And when you look at the baby, or an infant, the flexibility they have within the WHOLE body. 

赤ちゃんだの、小さい子だのを見るとわかるじゃない、頭の天辺からつま先まで、子供って柔軟性のかたまりでしょ。 

You know, they can really sort of do things with the limbs. Every percussionist wants to have and cling on to it, really. So..... 

それで、子供って両手両足を使って何でもやろうとするじゃない。パーカッション奏者はみんな、この感覚を一生持ち続けていたいものなのよ。 

 

A: But the simultaneous... I feel, I feel, uh, I don't know about you, but I feel, uh, I can have a rhythm in a way.  

司会:でも同時に・・・こう、何ていうか、君はどうかわからないけれど、その、僕もリズム感は持てるってことなんだね。 

But when you do different things, different rhythms with different hands and feet, then it's beyond me. 

でも君の場合、両手両足を使って、色んなことを、色んなリズムをやってのける。となると、やっぱり僕には無理なんじゃないかな。 

 

E: Well, it is, it is. Just you decide to use the word “It's beyond me.” You know, it isn't. 

エヴェリン:いいえ、そんなことないわ。「僕には無理」って言ったけど、そんなことないわ。 

That's my profession. So I have to pay attention to every limb, and make sure that whatever the right hand does, the left hand can also do. Whatever the left leg does, the right leg can also do.  

私はこれを仕事にしているわけだから、つまり、意識して両手両足を使っているのよ。右手でやることは左手でもできるし、左足でやることは右足でもできるってことなの。 

 

You know, that's part of my profession. That's part of what I train to do. 

これは仕事の一部だし、日々自分を鍛え上げてゆくところなのよ。 

 

Goldie Hawn: Are you taking notes? 

ゴールディ・ホーン:ほら、忘れないようにメモ取りなさいよ。 

 

A: Yes. Well, I.... You used to be a dancer. I mean, you have rhythm. 

司会:あ、うん・・・君はダンサーだったろう、だから、リズム感はあるよね。 

 

G: Yeah, there's a lot of music in your body. And, uh, also in acting. Because in acting I hear the same.. 

ゴールディ:勿論よ、音楽っていうのはみんなの体の中に備わっているものよ。あとお芝居もそうね。だって私は演技している時、それが聞こえるから。 

So comedians usually work..... or is very scientific because there are certain things that a comedian will do. 

だからコメディをするときも・・・ていうか、コメディって結構理論的にやるものなの。実際みんなそうしているから。 

And you can give it one, two, three beats. You can find it funny on the third beat, but it's not on the second. 

1,2,3タイミングを取って3のほうが笑いが取れるから2じゃなくしよう、とかね。 

 

E: Uh, it's interesting that. Because it is what happens in between. So those silences, there's no such thing as silence, of course, but what we are really paying attention to. We really are. 

エヴェリンなるほどね笑いを取れるポイントが、間と間のあいだってことね。そういう何もない瞬間、何もないなんてものはないけど、当り前だけど、でも私達はここに相当気を遣うわよね。 

 

G: It's like empty space in art, really. Those empty space are very powerful. 

ゴールディ:絵とか彫刻の何も手が加わっていないところみたいなものよそこって相当な力を放っているところじゃない。 

 

E: It is, really. But actually, when you have the presence of the audience there, that changes everything. And the rhythm can change, the placement of sound can change. 

エヴェリンホントよねでもね実際お客さんが眼の前にいると、ガラッと変わるものよね。リズムも変わるし、音を鳴らすタイミングも変わってくる。 

 

A: So your ambition is to teach people to listen, in a way? 

司会君は聴くってことを世の中に広く訴えていきたいって感じなのかな? 

 

E: Oh, you know, it's quite an ambition, actually. But we all have the opportunity to do that every single day of our lives. We really do. 

エヴェリンいやぁ、そんな大それたことは言わないわ。でもこれって、私達みんなが毎日の生活の中で、実際やっていることじゃないかしら。 

You know, we have a tendency to conduct our lives where looking downwards at the moment. 

あの私達って何かと下の方ばかり向いていないかしら。 

We are on our mobile phones or computers, and you know, “Oh, there's someone there,” but then, “Oh, yes, this is more important.” 

携帯だのパソコンだのに夢中になって、気づいたら「あら、人が立ってる」みたいな。でもすぐに「まあ、今は手が離せないから」ってなるでしょ。 

And we are missing not just that oral attention. But listening is about looking at a person and, William said, you know, looking at a horse's eye, as you know. 

こんなことをしていると言葉をかわすことに気持ちが行かなくなってしまうでも聴くってことは相手を見るってことでしょ。ウィリアムに言わせれば、馬の目を見ろってことかしら。 

Well, I can sort of understand that because suddenly, if you put sunglasses on, I would not be able to lip-read you as I do now, so that whole image changes. 

ええと、私にはわかるような気がするわだってもし今みんながサングラスを掛けたら、イメージが全然変わってしまって、今やれているみたいな読唇(口の動きから相手が何を言っているかを知る)ができなくなってしまう。 

So, your eyes and every sort of little frown or change of expression is VERY important to me. 

だからみんなの目とか、顔のパーツの僅かな動きとか、表情の変化とかは、私にとってはとても重要なの。 

 

 

次回後半は8歳で正常な聴覚を失い、その後学校のオーケストラ部の顧問の先生の一言で音楽に目覚めてゆく過程が語られます。 

<再掲・後半>ウィントン・マルサリス著「ハイヤーグラウンド 上を向いていこう」

 この本が元になり、オバマ大統領就任前夜、当時のアメリ最高裁判事、サンドラ・デイ・オコーナーとウィントンとの対談が実現、文末にその抜粋があります。

onmusic.hatenadiary.com

 

<再掲・前半>ウィントン・マルサリス著「ハイヤーグラウンド 上を向いていこう」

 2008年の話題作の、全訳の前半です。

onmusic.hatenadiary.com